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SOFT9021 - Declarative & Concurrent Prog.

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Title:Declarative & Concurrent Prog.
Long Title:Declarative & Concurrent Prog.
Module Code:SOFT9021
 
Credits: 5
NFQ Level:Expert
Field of Study: Computer Software
Valid From: Semester 1 - 2017/18 ( September 2017 )
Module Delivered in 2 programme(s)
Module Coordinator: TIM HORGAN
Module Author: Ignacio Castineiras
Module Description: In this module, learners will be introduced to parallel, concurrent and distributed programming, which are key concepts for correctly designing distributed-based applications and architectures. As part of this module students will be introduced to an industrial declarative programming language called Erlang, which is a programming language that has built in support for concurrency, distribution and fault tolerance. Using Erlang, students will design and implement applications that support concurrency and will access applications built using Erlang in terms of their scalability and resiliency.
Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this module the learner will be able to:
LO1 Differentiate among parallel, concurrent and distributed programming and the uses cases appealing to each of them.
LO2 Evaluate the main features of a declarative programming language such as Erlang in supporting scalability and fault tolerance in a distributed system.
LO3 Compare and contrast a declarative programming such as Erlang to an imperative programming language such as Java or C++ in supporting concurrency and distributed programming.
LO4 Design and implement a concurrent architecture for an application, assessing the creation and communication of processes.
LO5 Design and implement a distributed architecture for an application, assessing its scalability and fault tolerance.
Pre-requisite learning
Module Recommendations
This is prior learning (or a practical skill) that is strongly recommended before enrolment in this module. You may enrol in this module if you have not acquired the recommended learning but you will have considerable difficulty in passing (i.e. achieving the learning outcomes of) the module. While the prior learning is expressed as named CIT module(s) it also allows for learning (in another module or modules) which is equivalent to the learning specified in the named module(s).
No recommendations listed
Incompatible Modules
These are modules which have learning outcomes that are too similar to the learning outcomes of this module. You may not earn additional credit for the same learning and therefore you may not enrol in this module if you have successfully completed any modules in the incompatible list.
No incompatible modules listed
Co-requisite Modules
No Co-requisite modules listed
Requirements
This is prior learning (or a practical skill) that is mandatory before enrolment in this module is allowed. You may not enrol on this module if you have not acquired the learning specified in this section.
No requirements listed
Co-requisites
No Co Requisites listed
 

Module Content & Assessment

Indicative Content
Introduction to concepts.
Parallel programming- classification, process interaction, terminology, use cases. Concurrent programming - shared resources, coordinating access, languages to support concurrency. Distributed programming - concept overview. Differences between parallel, concurrent and distributed programming.
Imperative vs. Declarative Programming.
Imperative programming: Description of computations, assignable variables, mutable state. Declarative programming: Formalism and abstraction. Declarative and operational semantics for programs and their executions. Declarative programming main families: Logic Programming (LP) and Functional Programming (FP). On comparing the modelling for a probrem using LP, FP and imperative object-oriented (OO). Integration of FP features into OO programming languages.
Declarative Programming Families.
LP declarative semantics: A program as a set of (possibly non-deterministic) clauses. LP operational semantics: A program execution as a goal being solved/deducted via unification. LP predicates: Clause head and body, rules and facts. LP goals: Unification, search tree and backtracking. FP declarative semantics: A program as a set of deterministic functions. FP operational semantics: A program execution as an expression being reduced via rewriting. FP functions: Expressions, higher order and lambda abstractions. FP types: Static vs. dynamic typing, basic and defined data types, type inference, polymorphism. FP eager vs. lazy evaluation, pattern matching.
Nonsequential-based Applications.
Sequential-based computation: Operating system threads. Parallel, concurrent and distributed programming: Definition and differences. A concurrent/distributed architecture for an application: Motivation, use cases, design decisions. Nonsequential problems: Multi-threading, shared memory, race conditions.
Concurrent Programming.
Concurrency model of an industrial FP language. Process: Atomic component, OS abstraction via light VM encapsulation. Application as a set of independent process: Scalability and fault tolerance. Process communication: Assynchronous message passing, message inbox, priority policies, time-limits. Process planner: Dependent process via links, fault tolerance via monitors and state notification. Reactive programming vs. defensive programming.
Distributed Programming.
Distributed model of an industrial FP language. Motivation for a distributed application: Efficiency, resiliency, scalability. Distributed computation: Transparent network creation and communication. Nodes, hidden nodes, cookies, sockets.
Assessment Breakdown%
Course Work100.00%
Course Work
Assessment Type Assessment Description Outcome addressed % of total Assessment Date
Project Design, implement and document a sequential-based application using an imperative object-oriented programming and a functional programming. Produce a report to compare and contrast the modelling of the problem on the two paradigms, assessing how the use of declarative features allow for a more abstract and neat implementation. Design, implement and document a concurrent-based version of the application using functional programming. Assess the creation and communication of the processes in the application. 1,2,3,4 60.0 Week 8
Project Design, implement and document a distributed-based application, with an emphasis on ensuring its scalability and fault tolerance. Assess the creation, communication and supervision of the processes in the application. 1,2,5 40.0 Sem End
No End of Module Formal Examination
Reassessment Requirement
Coursework Only
This module is reassessed solely on the basis of re-submitted coursework. There is no repeat written examination.

The institute reserves the right to alter the nature and timings of assessment

 

Module Workload

Workload: Full Time
Workload Type Workload Description Hours Frequency Average Weekly Learner Workload
Lecture Lecture deliverying theory underpinning learning outcomes. 2.0 Every Week 2.00
Lab Practical computer-based lab supporting learning outcomes. 2.0 Every Week 2.00
Independent Learning Independent Study. 3.0 Every Week 3.00
Total Hours 7.00
Total Weekly Learner Workload 7.00
Total Weekly Contact Hours 4.00
Workload: Part Time
Workload Type Workload Description Hours Frequency Average Weekly Learner Workload
Lecture Lecture deliverying theory underpinning learning outcomes. 2.0 Every Week 2.00
Lab Practical computer-based lab supporting learning outcomes. 2.0 Every Week 2.00
Independent Learning Independent Study. 3.0 Every Week 3.00
Total Hours 7.00
Total Weekly Learner Workload 7.00
Total Weekly Contact Hours 4.00
 

Module Resources

Recommended Book Resources
  • Joe Armstrong 2013, Programming Erlang, 2nd Ed., Pragmatic Bookshelf [ISBN: 9781937785536]
  • Fred Hebert 2013, Learn You Some Erlang for Great Good - A Beginner's Guide, No Starch Press [ISBN: 9781593274351]
Supplementary Book Resources
  • Graham Hutton 2016, Programming in Haskell, 2nd Ed., Cambridge University Press [ISBN: 9781316626221]
  • Ivan Bratko 2011, PROLOG Programming for Artificial Intelligence, Addison-Wesley [ISBN: 9780321417466]
This module does not have any article/paper resources
Other Resources
 

Module Delivered in

Programme Code Programme Semester Delivery
CR_KSADE_9 Master of Science in Software Architecture & Design 1 Elective
CR_KSADE_9 Master of Science in Software Architecture & Design 2 Elective

Cork Institute of Technology
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